Archive | January, 2012

SOUTHEAST FLORIDA ANIMAL SHELTERS PARTNER TO BEAT THE HEAT!

29 Jan

 

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRESS RELEASE BY MIAMI -DADE COUNTY -ANIMAL SHELTER

 

SOUTHEAST FLORIDA ANIMAL SHELTERS

PARTNER TO BEAT THE HEAT!

Fort Lauderdale, FL – In an effort to help reduce the pet overpopulation problem in the Southeast Florida region, six animal shelters have joined forces and formed the Southeast Florida Region Spay/Neuter Coalition. The Coalition’s first project is called “Beat the Heat Spay/Neuter Week” and will take place February 21 – 25. This spay/neuter event is for felines eight weeks of age or older who are free-roaming, feral or lucky enough to have a home. The goal of the group is to collectively sterilize 1,650 cats during this time frame. The cost will be just $15 per cat and include rabies vaccination, FVRCP and a microchip.

The six organizations that formed the coalition are: Broward County Animal Care & Adoption, Humane Society of Broward County, Humane Society of Greater Miami, Miami-Dade Animal Services, Palm Beach County Animal Care & Control, and Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League. Based on the success of “Beat the Heat Spay/Neuter Week” the coalition hopes to facilitate additional spay/neuter programs in the near future for at-risk animals in the region.

While kittens are cute, the fact is there are simply too many unwanted cats and not enough homes. Only with your help can we reduce the number of unwanted cats entering shelters. Appointments are necessary, and you must be a resident of one of these counties to participate, so please contact the shelter near you to take advantage of this offer as space is limited.

Broward County Animal Care & Adoption: Humane Society of Broward County: Humane Society of Greater Miami: Miami-Dade Animal Services:

Palm Beach County Animal Care & Control: Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League:

954-359-1313 ext. 9271 954-895-3605 305-696-0800
311

561-233-1261 561-686-3663

Each shelter is independent and not affiliated with one another, however they are coming together to help promote this important message. Pet overpopulation is something we can control, but it will take help from every one to make a difference.

THE PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS A RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT, OR BE REIMBURSED FOR PAYMENT FOR

ANY OTHER SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT THAT IS PERFORMED AS A RESULT OF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE FREE, DISCOUNTED FEE, OR REDUCED FEE SERVICE, EXAMINATION, OR TREATMENT.

Pets Getting Dumped in Frigid Cold Weather

28 Jan

Pets Getting Dumped in Frigid Cold Weather

by Joyce F.

It’s no big surprise that winter weather in Fairbanks Alaska can be brutal.  The temperature there today is a frigid -49 F.  You read that right, it’s minus 49 degrees in Fairbanks.

With temperatures that dangerously low, people need to use extra caution when letting their pets go outside.  Yet some individuals have actually abandoned their pets at dump sites during Fairbank’s brutal winters.  In 2011, 28 animals were left at waste transfer sites. Three of the animals died by the time they were found.

From dogs and cats to goats and ferrets, animals have been left behind at waste transfer sites; tied to dumpsters or locked in cages with no protection from the elements.  Left to fend for themselves.  Left to freeze to death.

Frostbite literally means the destruction of skin and tissue by freezing.  As with humans, animals also suffer from frostbite.  Ice crystals form in their body tissue, killing it. Their ears, tail and paws may become discolored, blistered and painful. The dead skin peels off. Their internal organs may start to freeze.  If that starts to happen,  they will most likely need to be humanely euthanized once they are found.  Cats are especially affected by the cold.

Animals left out in the bitter cold can also be affected by hypothermia.  Hypothermia is an abnormal lowering of body temperature.  It can cause unconsciousness, shock and death.  Signs of hypothermia include shivering and weakness.

This is what the animals left at waste transfer sites in Fairbanks, AK had to endure.  For some, it was probably the last thing they remembered.

The Fairbanks animal shelter located at 2408 Davis Road offers heated drop-off cages, which are available 24 hours a day for surrendered pets.  Since they will be safe and warm there, there is no excuse for leaving an animal to die in the brutal cold.  Since this is a form of animal cruelty, people that abandon their animals can be arrested and charged.

In Alaska, animal cruelty is a class A misdemeanor.  Sentencing includes a fine of up to $5,000, imprisonment of up to 1 year, community service and restitution.  (Alaska Statute 11.61.140)

For those of us who don’t live in such an extreme climate, animals still need to be protected from the cold.  Exposure to temperatures below 32 degrees Fahrenheit can still cause frostbite in pets.

Photo courtesy of Eric Engman, Fairbanks Daily News-Miner | AP

Animal petitions sponsored by @Care2 wk 01/22/12

22 Jan

Animal Petitions sponsored by @Change.org wk 01/22/12

22 Jan

Petitions for Animals sponsored by @ForceChange.com wk 01/22/12

22 Jan

Independent Petitions that help animals wk 01/22/12

22 Jan